The Ultimate Egusi Soup

Egusi soup is not usually my favourite thing to eat and it is not helped by the childhood memories I have of spending HOURS shelling them.

Egusi is essentially the seeds of a melon or squash (please don’t ask me which variety πŸ™‚ ) which have been dried. They are then shelled and the white interior is what is milled and used in cooking.

However, after I made the egusi recipe that I am about to share with you, I must admit that I have had change of heart. It is easy to make and would be excellent for a weekend meal.


I bring this recipe in conjunction with Evron Food Store. They provided all the ingredients used in its preparation and used the photos for a media campaign which ran earlier, in February.

It was fun cooking and shooting the whole process. Of course eating it was the best part of it all!

Please note that this post is not sponsored by Evron Food store and all opinions are mine.

The ensuing slide show will set out the process in 8 simple steps.

The first step to making a great meal begins with using the best ingredients and mis en place.

To serve 4 people you will need:

Ingredients

  1. 200 grams goat meat (cut up in medium-sized pieces)
  2. 1 medium-sized smoked/dry fish
  3. 2 teaspoons milled cray fish
  4. 100 grams milled egusi
  5. 4 tablespoons palm oil
  6. 2 scotch bonnet peppers aka ata rodo (chopped)
  7. 50 grams finely julienned utazi leaves (you could use pumpkin leaves or kale but the utazi is wonderfully fragrant so it’ a nice addition)
  8. Salt as required.

Boil the goat meat until its tender. I seasoned mine with some ginger, the crayfish and salt but you cam season it however you prefer to. Reserve the stock.

Next, Bring a some water to boil and steep the dry fish in it with some salt for at least 15 minutes. This helps to rehydrate it as well as get rid of any grit/dirt on it. Carefully debone it and extract the fleshy bits and set aside. Now follow through on the easy steps in the slide show.

I opted to serve mine with some steamed rice although the normal pairing is with eba, pounded yam, fufu or other similar starchy meal (there so many options! πŸ™‚ )

The “How To”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

If you make this recipe, please take a picture and tag us on instagram using #foodfashionfusion. We will be happy to repost!

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